• Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

    Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist

    published: 25 Apr 2017
  • tomorrow today | Manganese nodules

    The seabeds of the worlds oceans are rich in raw materials such as diamonds, rare minerals and manganese nodules. They look like small potatoes but they contain metals such as nickel, cobalt and copper, and small amounts of rare metals like molybdenum, selenium and tellurium, which are used in the construction of electronics components.The hunt to recover the precious metals from the seabed has begun. German geologists recently carried out an extended research project in the Pacific. They wanted to find out how many manganese nodules there are, and where they are scattered. 24 million tons of precious metals are believed to be lying under the worlds oceans. The German geologists are trying to learn whether the nodules could be recovered from the seabed without damaging the environment, and...

    published: 16 Feb 2009
  • Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

    published: 09 Jun 2017
  • Blue Nodules

    Blue Nodules is an EU-funded project. Its aim is to develop a deep sea mining system for the harvesting of polymetallic nodules from the sea floor http://www.blue-nodules.eu/

    published: 08 Jan 2018
  • Deep Sea Ocean Mining - HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER Project Azorian 21050

    This historic film shows techniques used to conduct deep ocean mining of the sea floor, which were pioneered in the 1960s. The potential for this type of mining (particularly of manganese nodules) was never fully realized. Ironically, the program did end up providing the cover for the USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), a deep-sea drillship platform built for the United States Central Intelligence Agency Special Activities Division secret operation Project Azorian to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, lost in April 1968. Hughes Glomar Explorer (HGE), as the ship was called at the time, was built between 1973 and 1974, by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for more than US$350 million at the direction of Howard Hughes for use by his company, Global Marine Development Inc.[4] This ...

    published: 07 Aug 2014
  • G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

    Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: 1. Understanding the Ocean bottom relief 2. Division of ocean bottom: continental-margins, mid oceanic ridge and deep sea plains 3. Ocean-continent margins: continental shelf, continental slope, continental rise 4. Continental shelf: Petroleum resources 5. Map Reading: Persian gulf, strait of Hormuz , Map: Barent sea, Russia,arctic sea 6. Resources from continental shelf: sulphur in gulf of Mexico; placer deposit – monazite, gold, diamond, zircon 7. Resources from continental shelf: pearls, calcium and fish 8. Continental slope: submarine canyon and submarine water fall 9. Continental rise: transition zone, absent near trenches 10. Deep sea plain/ abyssal plain and their resources 11. Poly-metallic nodules, their metal-components, global distribution, Indi...

    published: 21 Feb 2015
  • JPI Oceans: Ecological Aspects of Deep-Sea Mining

    In 1989 German ocean researchers started a unique long-term experiment off the coast of Peru. To explore the effects of potential deep sea mining on the seabed, they plowed in about eleven square kilometer area around the seabed. (c) GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel 2016

    published: 31 Mar 2016
  • Polymetallic Nodules

    UK Seabed Resources, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin UK, in partnership with the Department for Business Innovation and Skills, has received a licence and contract to explore a 58,000 sq kilometre area of the Pacific for mineral-rich polymetallic nodules.

    published: 27 Mar 2013
  • 13 Breathtaking Underwater Discoveries

    Which of these discoveries do you find the most incredible? Let us know in the comments below and subscribe to our channel for more amazing videos just like this, thanks for watching. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 9 - Underwater ExplorerGoing over to Israel, divers discovered a water well that is thought to be around 7500-years old, along with a Neolithic village. It’s believed that the location of this well was possibly the site of the world’s oldest olive oil production centre. Around this site, they also discovered thousands of crushed olive stones, which led them to make that assumption. 8 - Get your dose of Vitamin Sea… Mark Holley is the person to credit for discovering an underwater structure that very closely resembles Stonehenge. He, along with his colleag...

    published: 26 May 2017
  • 10 Weird Sea Discoveries

    From bizarre fish found in the Mariana Trench to deep sea mystery of one of the oldest fish on earth, these are 10 WEIRD sea discoveries ! Underwater River -- Known as the Cenote (say-no-tay) Angelita Cave, this so-called underwater river can only be accessed by skilled divers. It’s located on the east coast of the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, and was formed over 6500 years ago, after a Manganese (manga-knees) Balls -- In 2015, scientists exploring the Atlantic Ocean were surprised to discover a huge patch of metal balls, some as small as golf balls, with others approximately the size of bowling balls. Turns out the metal balls are actually nodules made of manganese, and are commonly found in the Pacific, not the Atlantic. Scientists noted another difference … the nodules found in t...

    published: 07 Aug 2016
  • 14 Shocking Ocean Discoveries

    The ocean is one mysterious place, here are 14 shocking discoveries that you wont believe actually exist! Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr #7 The Non-Extinct “ExtinctFish, the Coelacanth This menacing-looking fish has quite a history. Thought to be extinct with the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period, the fish was discovered very much alive in 1938 when a fisherman caught one off the coast of East Africa. Even more shocking was the fact that another species of the Coelacanth was caught in the Indian Ocean by a fisherman and offered up for sale at a fish market in July 1998, letting scientists know that there are more species of this “extinct” fish than previously thought! The fish was 5ft long and weighed 29kg. #6 The Metal Balls of the Atlantic Ocean Scienti...

    published: 26 Feb 2016
  • Mystery Balls Found In Atlantic, Small Metal Orbs Found In Earth's Atmosphere

    http://www.undergroundworldnews.com Ever since they were discovered in 1873, scientists have been trying to find out the origin of the millions of potato-sized metal balls that carpet the world's oceans. Known as manganese nodules, these lumps contain valuable metals that scientists someday hope to harvest from the sea floor. Now German scientists could be closer to solving the mystery of their origin after stumbling on the largest patch of manganese nodules ever found in the Atlantic. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2957453/What-mystery-alien-balls-ocean-floor-Scientists-baffled-manganese-rocks-discovered-Atlantic.html#ixzz3S3f6vIzi Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2955620/Did-aliens-sen...

    published: 18 Feb 2015
  • What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy

    Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode webseries dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future...

    published: 12 Feb 2018
  • Robots to mine the ocean floor the risks and rewards of deep sea mining

    published: 01 Jul 2017
  • ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

    Description

    published: 06 Apr 2015
  • NODULE: NUMINOSITY

    This track was based on my ongoing love of deep sea creatures and microscopic life. My website is www.gerrycarnelly.co.uk You can hear more of my music at https://soundcloud.com/octoboy

    published: 26 Mar 2017
  • Deep Sea Sediment Cores

    published: 04 May 2011
  • 8 Strange New Deep Sea Creatures

    Learn about some new sea creatures that recently made their debut to the land world! Special Thanks To: Victoria Vásquez at Pacific Shark Research Center, Kim Fulton-Bennett at MBARI, Jonathan Copley at University of Southampton, and Theodore Pietsch at University of Washington Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Accalia Elementia, Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Justin Lentz, Fatima Iqbal, Thomas J., Chris Peters, Tim Curwick, Lucy McGlasson, Andreas Heydeck, Will and Sonja Marple, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Charles George, Christopher Collins, and Patrick D. Ashmore. ----------...

    published: 08 Jun 2016
  • Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

    http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitco...

    published: 18 Mar 2011
  • David Billett on the challenges for deep-sea exploration and exploitation - DSBS 2015

    Interview recorded in the SOPHIA Studio (www.sophia-mar.pt) during the Deep-Sea Biology Symposium (DSBS, Aveiro 2015). Topics: Ocean connectivity (food chain, surface productivity, sea cucumbers case study); The International Seabed Authority (scope, mission, organization bodies, the UNCLOS, deep-sea mining regulations, resource exploitation in ABNJ, access and benefit sharing); Types of deep-sea minerals (polymetallic nodules, polymetallic sulfides, cobalt crusts); New technologies for deep-sea research, exploration and exploitation; Need for science-industry cooperation; The importance of public outreach on policy making; Deep-sea mining study case (public perceptions, decision-making complexity); ISA's decision making process (building consensus); Precautionary approach vs sampling pro...

    published: 10 May 2016
  • AMAZING Recently Discovered Species

    You’d think by now we’ve done a pretty good job at cataloguing all of the species in the world, but we’re far from done! Scientists believe there are around 8.7 million species in the world, with between 1 and 2 million of those being animals. And it’s thought the vast majority have not even been documented yet. 2017 saw a number of fascinating new discoveries, and we’ll touch on some of them today. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 10 - Not for human consumption… Don’t let the name Churro mislead you, there is nothing tasty about this new marine worm that was discovered in the Gulf of California in 2017. They’ve called it Churro because of the striking resemblance to a Churro, the delicious fried-dough pastry dessert that is dipped into sweet sauces. This worm is between 4 and...

    published: 21 Jan 2018
  • Cabinet approves signing of 15-year contract with International Seabed Authority

    Cabinet has approved signing of 15-year contract with International Seabed Authority for undertaking exploration of Polymetallic Sulphides. ‘DD News’ is the News Channel of India's Public Service Broadcaster 'Prasar Bharati'. DD News has been successfully discharging its responsibility to give balanced, fair and accurate news without sensationalizing as well as by carrying different shades of opinion. Follow DD News on Twitter (English): https://twitter.com/ddnewslive Twitter (Hindi):https://twitter.com/DDNewsHindi Face Book: https://www.facebook.com/DDNews Visit DD News Website (English): www.ddinews.gov.in Visit DD News Website (Hindi): http://ddinews.gov.in/Hindi/

    published: 15 Jun 2016
  • Life at deep sea hydrothermal vents: biodiversity in a new resource frontier

    Lecture by Dr Adrian Glover given at the Geological Society on 3 July 2013 as part of the 2013 Shell London Lecture series. It is an oft-told tale that the most famous biological discovery of the late 20th century was made by geologists. In the spring of 1977, a cabal of bearded American oceanographers made the first daring submersible dives to a deep-sea hydrothermal vent in the east Pacific ocean and filmed, photographed and collected the biology that would make them famous. But it was no ignominy for the biology community; uninvited on that first expedition they went on to lead the majority of research at vents over the next three decades. Over 35 years on, it is the geology which may now turn attention back to the deep sea. In 2011 the government of Papua New Guinea granted the world...

    published: 22 Aug 2013
  • The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

    The ocean has a wealth of resources. From food, to travel, to pharmaceutical needs, and to energy, the ocean has always provided for mankind. And now, mankind is turning to the ocean for minerals and metals needed for the technology we use in our everyday lives. An exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers. Read more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/underwater-mining-pacific-ocean

    published: 14 Dec 2016
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Deep-sea mining could transform the globe
2:33

Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:33
  • Updated: 25 Apr 2017
  • views: 43939
videos
Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Could_Transform_The_Globe
tomorrow today | Manganese nodules
4:25

tomorrow today | Manganese nodules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:25
  • Updated: 16 Feb 2009
  • views: 12086
videos
The seabeds of the worlds oceans are rich in raw materials such as diamonds, rare minerals and manganese nodules. They look like small potatoes but they contain metals such as nickel, cobalt and copper, and small amounts of rare metals like molybdenum, selenium and tellurium, which are used in the construction of electronics components.The hunt to recover the precious metals from the seabed has begun. German geologists recently carried out an extended research project in the Pacific. They wanted to find out how many manganese nodules there are, and where they are scattered. 24 million tons of precious metals are believed to be lying under the worlds oceans. The German geologists are trying to learn whether the nodules could be recovered from the seabed without damaging the environment, and which technology would be best suited to do that. We take a look at their findings.
https://wn.com/Tomorrow_Today_|_Manganese_Nodules
Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals
5:34

Exploration of Deep Sea Minerals

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:34
  • Updated: 09 Jun 2017
  • views: 491
videos
https://wn.com/Exploration_Of_Deep_Sea_Minerals
Blue Nodules
1:12

Blue Nodules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:12
  • Updated: 08 Jan 2018
  • views: 108
videos
Blue Nodules is an EU-funded project. Its aim is to develop a deep sea mining system for the harvesting of polymetallic nodules from the sea floor http://www.blue-nodules.eu/
https://wn.com/Blue_Nodules
Deep Sea Ocean Mining - HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER Project Azorian 21050
14:30

Deep Sea Ocean Mining - HUGHES GLOMAR EXPLORER Project Azorian 21050

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:30
  • Updated: 07 Aug 2014
  • views: 12730
videos
This historic film shows techniques used to conduct deep ocean mining of the sea floor, which were pioneered in the 1960s. The potential for this type of mining (particularly of manganese nodules) was never fully realized. Ironically, the program did end up providing the cover for the USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), a deep-sea drillship platform built for the United States Central Intelligence Agency Special Activities Division secret operation Project Azorian to recover the sunken Soviet submarine K-129, lost in April 1968. Hughes Glomar Explorer (HGE), as the ship was called at the time, was built between 1973 and 1974, by Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for more than US$350 million at the direction of Howard Hughes for use by his company, Global Marine Development Inc.[4] This is equivalent to $1.67 billion in present-day terms.[5] She set sail on 20 June 1974. Hughes told the media that the ship's purpose was to extract manganese nodules from the ocean floor. This marine geology cover story became surprisingly influential, spurring many others to examine the idea. But in sworn testimony in United States district court proceedings and in appearances before government agencies, Global Marine executives and others associated with Hughes Glomar Explorer project unanimously maintained that the ship could not be used in any economically viable ocean mineral operation. This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Ocean_Mining_Hughes_Glomar_Explorer_Project_Azorian_21050
G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules
31:13

G5/P1: Ocean Resources, EEZ, petroleum reserves, Polymetallic nodules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 31:13
  • Updated: 21 Feb 2015
  • views: 197788
videos
Language: Hindi, Topics Covered: 1. Understanding the Ocean bottom relief 2. Division of ocean bottom: continental-margins, mid oceanic ridge and deep sea plains 3. Ocean-continent margins: continental shelf, continental slope, continental rise 4. Continental shelf: Petroleum resources 5. Map Reading: Persian gulf, strait of Hormuz , Map: Barent sea, Russia,arctic sea 6. Resources from continental shelf: sulphur in gulf of Mexico; placer deposit – monazite, gold, diamond, zircon 7. Resources from continental shelf: pearls, calcium and fish 8. Continental slope: submarine canyon and submarine water fall 9. Continental rise: transition zone, absent near trenches 10. Deep sea plain/ abyssal plain and their resources 11. Poly-metallic nodules, their metal-components, global distribution, India’s exploration of PMN 12. UNCLOS- UN convention of Laws of the seas 13. Discussion of previous questions from UPSC Prelims Powerpoint available at http://Mrunal.org/download Exam-Utility: UPSC CSAT, CDS, CAPF Faculty Name: Ms. Rajtanil Solanki Venue: Sardar Patel Institute of Public Administration (SPIPA), Satellite, Ahmedabad, Gujarat,India
https://wn.com/G5_P1_Ocean_Resources,_Eez,_Petroleum_Reserves,_Polymetallic_Nodules
JPI Oceans: Ecological Aspects of Deep-Sea Mining
4:08

JPI Oceans: Ecological Aspects of Deep-Sea Mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:08
  • Updated: 31 Mar 2016
  • views: 1489
videos
In 1989 German ocean researchers started a unique long-term experiment off the coast of Peru. To explore the effects of potential deep sea mining on the seabed, they plowed in about eleven square kilometer area around the seabed. (c) GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel 2016
https://wn.com/Jpi_Oceans_Ecological_Aspects_Of_Deep_Sea_Mining
Polymetallic Nodules
3:12

Polymetallic Nodules

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:12
  • Updated: 27 Mar 2013
  • views: 12083
videos
UK Seabed Resources, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin UK, in partnership with the Department for Business Innovation and Skills, has received a licence and contract to explore a 58,000 sq kilometre area of the Pacific for mineral-rich polymetallic nodules.
https://wn.com/Polymetallic_Nodules
13 Breathtaking Underwater Discoveries
6:23

13 Breathtaking Underwater Discoveries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:23
  • Updated: 26 May 2017
  • views: 329554
videos
Which of these discoveries do you find the most incredible? Let us know in the comments below and subscribe to our channel for more amazing videos just like this, thanks for watching. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 9 - Underwater ExplorerGoing over to Israel, divers discovered a water well that is thought to be around 7500-years old, along with a Neolithic village. It’s believed that the location of this well was possibly the site of the world’s oldest olive oil production centre. Around this site, they also discovered thousands of crushed olive stones, which led them to make that assumption. 8 - Get your dose of Vitamin Sea… Mark Holley is the person to credit for discovering an underwater structure that very closely resembles Stonehenge. He, along with his colleague Brian Abbot, were out on a ship with sonar equipment. They spotted an odd formation in the water. This was on Lake Michigan, and all the structures are said to be the same distance apart and are quite similar to structures found in France and England, making people doubt that they are a natural formation. Research is still being conducted. 7 - Under the sea… This discovery has been astounding for scientists, and has seen the most amazing images emerge from their super find. It’s a river under the sea, which was found on Mexico's Yucatan peninsula. It’s called the Cenote Angelita, translated to Little Angel – and you see a winding river and even branches! The river is actually hydrogen sulphide, a gas created by the mixture of salt and fresh water. Only exceptionally skilled divers are able to get there, so thank goodness for excellent underwater cameras! 6 - Just Add Water… In 2014, a group of divers made an incredible discovery. Whilst they were diving off the coast of Goza island in Malta, they came up a Phoenician shipwreck which is thought to date back to 700 BC. This is one of the oldest ships recovered, and there are so many pieces in tact – which will be highly beneficial in in shedding light on life back then. Part of the relics discovered include 20 lava grinding stones, large wine jugs and other pieces of crockery. 5 - The ocean is full of surprises… These alien looking balls have been found on the ocean floor, and are baffling scientists. They are manganese rocks, and they contain valuable metal. They were found in the Atlantic Ocean, and their purpose has been confusing people since the 1870’s! Some suggest it’s a chemical reaction between bacteria and the water. They’re called manganese nodules, and German scientists have discovered a vast amount of them. They grow between 1 and 5 mm every million years, so some are thought to be 10 million years old! 4 - The gap widens… Divers have been instrumental in showing us how the North American Plate is pulling away from the Eurasian Plate – which means the gap between Europe and the USA is widening! In order for you to dive there yourself, you would need to take a trip to Iceland! 3 - So much to discover… According to some sites, we have only scratched the bottom of the surface of the ocean, and still have about 95% of the ocean to still discover. If that’s the case, imagine what is still out there for us to find! Over in New Jersey, archaeologists found 2 beautifully preserved locomotives dating back to the 1850’s. No record of when the trains were built or when they were lost, and to this day – no one can explain how they got there. 2 - My heads under water… It was back in 2000 that French archaeologist, Franck Goddio discovered Heracleion. It’s an underwater city based near Alexandria in Egypt, and during the 13 years spent excavating the area – many incredible items have resurfaced. The city dates back to the 12th century, and it went through a stage of extreme wealth. It’s thought to have sunk due to earthquakes, and had been buried for centuries. Some of the items discovered included 60 ships, gold coins, bronze and stone weights, statues, stone with Greek and Egyptian inscription and hundreds of anchors. 1 - Sink or swim… These are called Ice Fingers, and as you can guess – they’re a totally rare phenomenon which occurs in the Arctic and Antarctic. They’re the result of cold, sinking brine which is heavier than the water surrounding it. It goes on to form a brinicle, which is a hollow icicle, when it comes into contact with the warmer water. It’s been dubbed the ice finger of death, because any sea creature caught in the expanding web of ice, are caught for good and end up freezing to death. The BBC One series, Frozen Planet, managed to film one – which took a total of 6 hours to form and sink.
https://wn.com/13_Breathtaking_Underwater_Discoveries
10 Weird Sea Discoveries
8:12

10 Weird Sea Discoveries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:12
  • Updated: 07 Aug 2016
  • views: 124601
videos
From bizarre fish found in the Mariana Trench to deep sea mystery of one of the oldest fish on earth, these are 10 WEIRD sea discoveries ! Underwater River -- Known as the Cenote (say-no-tay) Angelita Cave, this so-called underwater river can only be accessed by skilled divers. It’s located on the east coast of the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, and was formed over 6500 years ago, after a Manganese (manga-knees) Balls -- In 2015, scientists exploring the Atlantic Ocean were surprised to discover a huge patch of metal balls, some as small as golf balls, with others approximately the size of bowling balls. Turns out the metal balls are actually nodules made of manganese, and are commonly found in the Pacific, not the Atlantic. Scientists noted another difference … the nodules found in the Pacific usually have a flatter shape, while the ones from the Atlantic were very circular. Found at depths of 18000 feet, the nodules are thought to be 10 million years old … but their origin remains a mystery. The Churro Worm -- Four new species of an undersea creature were found 12000 feet underwater off the California coast. Called Xenoturbella (zen-ott-er-bella), they are fuschia colored flatworm-like creatures found on a whale carcass as well as on hydrothermal vents. One of the new species was christened ‘Xenoturbella Churro’, due to its resemblance to the Spanish fried-dough pastry. The four-inch long animal may have another claim to fame: It, along with its fellow species, could be related to us. In 2003, scientists at Cambridge claimed that Xenoturbella might share DNA with humans. Benthic (ben-tik) Comb Jelly -- Found within Japan’s Ryukyu (ree-you-kyou) Trench at an incredible depth of over 23,000 feet (7200 meters), this is the deepest dwelling known ctenophore (ten-uh-fur). The gelatinous organism can measure up to 8 cm wide and up to 20 cm long, and can attach itself to the ocean floor using two long filaments. Prior to its discovery in 2002, many scientists didn’t think it was possible for similar life forms to exist at such extreme depths, because food resources would be so scarce. The very existence of this animal suggests that there’s still much of the region’s ecosystem that remains unknown. Grand Underwater Canyon -- Named Zhemchug (gem-kug) Canyon, this huge underwater formation is located in the middle of the Bering Sea. Also defined as a submarine canyon, or a steep sided valley carved into the sea floor of the continental shelf, Zhemchug (gem-kug) is the largest such formation in the world … and reaching a depth of 8530 ft (2.6 km), it’s deeper than the Grand Canyon, with its deepest point being 6000 feet. The underwater canyon provides an important habitat to a wide range of ocean wildlife, including the Northern Fur Seal and many species of whale. Deep Diving Fish -- In 2010, marine biologists discovered a new type of snailfish almost 23,000 feet deep in the southeast Pacific Ocean. That’s nearly 4.5 miles below the ocean’s surface! In addition, groups of large crustacean scavengers and eels were found in the Peru-Chile trench of the ocean, which runs over 3600 miles and can reach depths of 26,000 feet. One of the deepest locations on earth, the area was previously thought to be completely free of fish. These discoveries might indicate there are thousands more unknown marine animals existing at extreme depths in the world’s oceans. In fact, a new species of snailfish was discovered in 2014 at a depth of over 26,000 feet by researchers using a remote operated vehicle while exploring the Mariana Trench in the Pacific. The Greater Barrier Reef -- The eastern coast of Australia is famous for the Great Barrier Reef … but now there may be a bigger, more spectacular reef on the south coast of the country. Take a look at some of these stunning pictures, and you can understand the excitement. Using a remote operated vehicle, researchers in 2015 explored depths up to 100 meters at Wilsons Promontory National Park in Victoria, Australia. Boulders the size of houses, and spectacular sponge gardens were some of the discoveries made ... along with coral fans and huge sea whips. Among the abundant fish species encountered were Australian barracudas, Longsnout Boarfish, and large schools of deep sea perch, known to grow over 2.5 feet long (80 cm). Park officials planned to analyze more footage to determine areas that might be safest for scuba divers. Subscribe to Epic Wildlife http://goo.gl/6rzs5u Let's Connect -- http://www.epicadamwildlife.com/ -- http://www.facebook.com/epicadamwildlife -- http://www.twitter.com/epicwildlife -- http://gplus.to/epicwildlife
https://wn.com/10_Weird_Sea_Discoveries
14 Shocking Ocean Discoveries
9:59

14 Shocking Ocean Discoveries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:59
  • Updated: 26 Feb 2016
  • views: 5111958
videos
The ocean is one mysterious place, here are 14 shocking discoveries that you wont believe actually exist! Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr #7 The Non-Extinct “ExtinctFish, the Coelacanth This menacing-looking fish has quite a history. Thought to be extinct with the dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period, the fish was discovered very much alive in 1938 when a fisherman caught one off the coast of East Africa. Even more shocking was the fact that another species of the Coelacanth was caught in the Indian Ocean by a fisherman and offered up for sale at a fish market in July 1998, letting scientists know that there are more species of this “extinct” fish than previously thought! The fish was 5ft long and weighed 29kg. #6 The Metal Balls of the Atlantic Ocean Scientists who were in the Atlantic Ocean to study sea organisms found something a bit more unusual than they expected when their equipment kept getting snagged on something. They unearthed metal balls, known as manganese balls. These balls occur in other oceans, growing at the rate of millimeters over the course a million years by crystallizing around rocks or fossils into a nodule. To see so many on the ocean floor, especially some so round, was quite a shock to researchers, who even put out a press release about the discovery. #5 The Baltic Sea Anomaly Scientists have been debating the true nature of a large, mushroom-shaped disc found under the Baltic Sea in June 2011. Sonar images of the object show a stone or granite disc that resembles an ancient Millennium Falcon! The 200 by 25 ft disc could be a Nazi device that was located on the Baltic Sea shipping route that was made of steel and wire mesh designed to block radar detection by British and Russian submarines that used the area during World War II. Explorers have been repeatedly stymied by the Baltic Sea Anomaly because their sonar, radar and even satellite phones stop working when they get within 200 meters of the site. UFOlogists see it differently; they believe the disc is an ancient alien aircraft. Yeah, but how many parsecs would it take to make the Kessel Run? #4 The Mayan Underworld The ancient Mayans believed that in order to make it to the afterlife, dead souls needed to traverse watery caves with the help of a blind dog, and that caves are natural portals to other worlds. In 2008, scientists discovered huge underwater caves off the Yucatan Peninsula. The caves are large enough to contain stone temples and pyramids, sculptures, and human remains, mirroring the Maya belief that souls would confront great challenges on the way to the next world. One eerie passage consists of a 300 foot road leading straight to the water. Now scientists must ponder whether the Mayan beliefs were inspired by the existence of the caves, or whether the Maya created the caves as part of their religious practices. #3 The Yeti Crab You may have seen a variety of crabs at a visit to the aquarium, but you’ve probably not seen a crab like this. Known as the Yeti Crab, this species was discovered in 2005 in the South Pacific Ocean. The crab’s discovery required scientists to actually create a new genus, Kiwaidae. This crab is special not only because it’s hairy, but also because it has no eyes. It grows its own food and bacteria in its fur and lives in hydrothermal vents. #2 The Galleon San Jose Built in 1696, the Spanish ship Galleon San Jose was lost in 1708, after crewmembers were engaged in a sea battle with the English. On November 27, 2015, the wreckage of the ship was found in the Caribbean Sea, along with its treasure. Originally on its way to France, the ship was laden with cargo of gold, silver and emeralds when it sank, and 600 people were reportedly on board when the ship went down. Many of the ship’s personal effects, cannons, and guns are still intact. Before the discovery, historians believed the ship had exploded. The recovered treasure is worth an estimated $3 to $17 billion. #1 The “LostUnderwater Forest You may find a city or ruins, or sunken treasure in the sea, but finding a forest is probably a dream….But for diver Dawn Watson, finding a lost forest went from fantasy to reality. In 2015, Watson discovered an incredible underwater forest off the coast of Norfolk. The trees are estimated to be near 10,000 years, and have been hidden underwater since the Ice Age, only to be uncovered during a storm. The forest was once part of Doggerland, a piece of land that was a bridge between Britain and Europe.
https://wn.com/14_Shocking_Ocean_Discoveries
Mystery Balls Found In Atlantic, Small Metal Orbs Found In Earth's Atmosphere
3:06

Mystery Balls Found In Atlantic, Small Metal Orbs Found In Earth's Atmosphere

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  • Duration: 3:06
  • Updated: 18 Feb 2015
  • views: 16070
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http://www.undergroundworldnews.com Ever since they were discovered in 1873, scientists have been trying to find out the origin of the millions of potato-sized metal balls that carpet the world's oceans. Known as manganese nodules, these lumps contain valuable metals that scientists someday hope to harvest from the sea floor. Now German scientists could be closer to solving the mystery of their origin after stumbling on the largest patch of manganese nodules ever found in the Atlantic. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2957453/What-mystery-alien-balls-ocean-floor-Scientists-baffled-manganese-rocks-discovered-Atlantic.html#ixzz3S3f6vIzi Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2955620/Did-aliens-send-metal-orb-seed-life-Earth-Microscopic-sphere-contain-microorganisms-claims-astrobiologist.html
https://wn.com/Mystery_Balls_Found_In_Atlantic,_Small_Metal_Orbs_Found_In_Earth's_Atmosphere
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy
6:45

What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy

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  • Duration: 6:45
  • Updated: 12 Feb 2018
  • views: 1239
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Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode webseries dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This webseries addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy is a cartographical survey of technologies that have contributed to ocean literacy and seabed mapping. Structured around a single shot along a vertical axis, the episode inquires about deep sea mining and the types of geologic formations where it is set to occur, particularly hydrothermal vents. Understanding the process of deep sea mining demands not only a temporal investigation – its main dates, legal, and corporate landmarks, and scientific breakthroughs – but also a spatial axis connecting the seafloor to outer space cartographic technologies. After all, we know less about the ocean depths than about the universe beyond this blue planet. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: http://www.deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ http://www.savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ http://deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 http://oceanolivre.org/ https://www.facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Ann Dom, Armin Linke, Birgit Schneider, Duncan Currie, Katherine Sammler, Lisa Rave, Lucielle Paru, Matt Gianni, Natalie Lowrey, Payal Sampat, Phil Weaver, Stefan Helmreich, and everyone who helped this webseries. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. Commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy. www.tba21academy.org http://www.tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282
https://wn.com/What_Is_Deep_Sea_Mining_A_Web_Series._Episode_1_Tools_For_Ocean_Literacy
Robots to mine the ocean floor  the risks and rewards of deep sea mining
1:53

Robots to mine the ocean floor the risks and rewards of deep sea mining

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  • Duration: 1:53
  • Updated: 01 Jul 2017
  • views: 109
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https://wn.com/Robots_To_Mine_The_Ocean_Floor_The_Risks_And_Rewards_Of_Deep_Sea_Mining
ENS351 Deep Sea Mining
6:06

ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

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  • Duration: 6:06
  • Updated: 06 Apr 2015
  • views: 5788
videos https://wn.com/Ens351_Deep_Sea_Mining
NODULE: NUMINOSITY
5:23

NODULE: NUMINOSITY

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  • Duration: 5:23
  • Updated: 26 Mar 2017
  • views: 64
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This track was based on my ongoing love of deep sea creatures and microscopic life. My website is www.gerrycarnelly.co.uk You can hear more of my music at https://soundcloud.com/octoboy
https://wn.com/Nodule_Numinosity
Deep Sea Sediment Cores
7:46

Deep Sea Sediment Cores

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  • Duration: 7:46
  • Updated: 04 May 2011
  • views: 930
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https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Sediment_Cores
8 Strange New Deep Sea Creatures
9:31

8 Strange New Deep Sea Creatures

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  • Duration: 9:31
  • Updated: 08 Jun 2016
  • views: 1673700
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Learn about some new sea creatures that recently made their debut to the land world! Special Thanks To: Victoria Vásquez at Pacific Shark Research Center, Kim Fulton-Bennett at MBARI, Jonathan Copley at University of Southampton, and Theodore Pietsch at University of Washington Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Accalia Elementia, Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Justin Lentz, Fatima Iqbal, Thomas J., Chris Peters, Tim Curwick, Lucy McGlasson, Andreas Heydeck, Will and Sonja Marple, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Charles George, Christopher Collins, and Patrick D. Ashmore. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: Ninja Lanternshark: http://www.deepseanews.com/2015/12/ninja-lanternshark-the-new-shark-species-you-will-never-see-coming/ http://www.oceansciencefoundation.org/josf/josf17d.pdf https://mlmlblog.wordpress.com/2016/04/13/ninjalanternshark/ Sockworms: http://www.mbari.org/deep-sea-worms-slither-around-the-bottom-of-the-animal-tree-of-life/ http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v530/n7588/full/nature16545.html#t http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v424/n6951/full/nature01851.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrlIHaClWmg http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/why-you-should-care-about-acoelomorph-flatworms-17782785/?no-ist Hoff Crabs: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0127621 http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-03/uos-iha030215.php https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gPyG6cT_pU http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew16.jpg http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew14.jpg youtube.com/expeditionlog Eyeless Shrimp: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qtR18l5_ys http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slider4.jpg http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew24.jpg http://www.joncopley.com/css/images/slidernew7.jpg http://www.livescience.com/31034-embargoed-eyeless-shrimp-discovered-deepest-volcanic-vents.html youtube.com/expeditionlog Anglerfish http://www.sci-news.com/biology/science-lasiognathus-dinema-anglerfish-03102.html http://www.bioone.org/doi/10.1643/CI-14-181 http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/150807-anglerfish-new-species-ocean-animals-science/ Harp Sponge http://www.mbari.org/scientists-discover-extraordinary-new-carnivorous-sponge/ - Harp sponge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VC3tAtXdaik http://www.mbari.org/researchers-describe-four-new-species-of-killer-sponges-from-the-deep-sea/ - other new carnivorous sponges Casper Octopus http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1603/logs/mar2/mar2.html [images available to download and use] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6rWHuwWJv3c&ab_channel=oceanexplorergov Crossota Jellyfish http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/about.html http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1605/background/ex1605-factsheet.pdf http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1605/dailyupdates/media/video/0424-jelly/0424-jelly.html
https://wn.com/8_Strange_New_Deep_Sea_Creatures
Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier
4:29

Deep Ocean Mining: The New Frontier

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  • Duration: 4:29
  • Updated: 18 Mar 2011
  • views: 5935
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http://www.kitco.com - David Heydon, Founder & Chairman of DeepGreen Resources, discusses the brave new world of deep ocean mining in international waters. Underwater mineral findings include copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, and Heydon discusses both the efficiencies and difficulties of this new method of mining. For more exclusive PDAC coverage visit http://www.kitco.com/pdac Join the discussion @ the Kitco Forums - http://www.kitcomm.com Follow us on twitter @ http://www.twitter.com/kitconewsnow Connect w/ Kitco News on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/hr3FdK Send your feedback to newsfeedback@kitco.com http://www.kitco.com --- Agree? Disagree? Join the conversation @ The Kitco Forums and be part of the premier online community for precious metals investors: http://kitcomm.com -- Or join the conversation on social media: @KitcoNewsNOW on Twitter: http://twitter.com/kitconews --- Kitco News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/kitconews
https://wn.com/Deep_Ocean_Mining_The_New_Frontier
David Billett on the challenges for deep-sea exploration and exploitation - DSBS 2015
24:20

David Billett on the challenges for deep-sea exploration and exploitation - DSBS 2015

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  • Duration: 24:20
  • Updated: 10 May 2016
  • views: 121
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Interview recorded in the SOPHIA Studio (www.sophia-mar.pt) during the Deep-Sea Biology Symposium (DSBS, Aveiro 2015). Topics: Ocean connectivity (food chain, surface productivity, sea cucumbers case study); The International Seabed Authority (scope, mission, organization bodies, the UNCLOS, deep-sea mining regulations, resource exploitation in ABNJ, access and benefit sharing); Types of deep-sea minerals (polymetallic nodules, polymetallic sulfides, cobalt crusts); New technologies for deep-sea research, exploration and exploitation; Need for science-industry cooperation; The importance of public outreach on policy making; Deep-sea mining study case (public perceptions, decision-making complexity); ISA's decision making process (building consensus); Precautionary approach vs sampling problem; Need for consistent funding of deep-sea research. David Billett, PhD in Deep-sea Ecology at the University of Southampton, is the Managing Director at Deep Seas Environmental Solutions and a Visiting Research Fellow at the National Oceanography Centre. His work focuses in finding solutions for the use of ocean resources and the long-term conservation of marine ecosystems. 00:08 Research focus 02:33 About the ISA 06:34 Types of deep-sea minerals 11:57 Technology for deep-sea exploration and exploitation 12:44 Science-industry cooperation 15:03 Public outreach 16:56 Deep-sea mining 19:56 Decision-making process: the ISA case 21:50 Challenges for deep-sea research SOPHIA - Knowledge for the management of marine environment is a literacy for the oceans project developed in Portugal. It is a not for profit collaboration between the Administration and knowledge and research community. It provides training and knowledge content to help develop a common language within this community. Follow us on: www.sophia-mar.pt www.facebook.com/sophia.mar.pt twitter.com/Projeto_SOPHIA Deep-Sea Biology Symposium - The triennial DSBS is the most important meeting for deep-sea biologists around the world. The 14th edition was held in Aveiro, Portugal, in 2015.
https://wn.com/David_Billett_On_The_Challenges_For_Deep_Sea_Exploration_And_Exploitation_Dsbs_2015
AMAZING Recently Discovered Species
9:20

AMAZING Recently Discovered Species

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  • Duration: 9:20
  • Updated: 21 Jan 2018
  • views: 156623
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You’d think by now we’ve done a pretty good job at cataloguing all of the species in the world, but we’re far from done! Scientists believe there are around 8.7 million species in the world, with between 1 and 2 million of those being animals. And it’s thought the vast majority have not even been documented yet. 2017 saw a number of fascinating new discoveries, and we’ll touch on some of them today. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 10 - Not for human consumption… Don’t let the name Churro mislead you, there is nothing tasty about this new marine worm that was discovered in the Gulf of California in 2017. They’ve called it Churro because of the striking resemblance to a Churro, the delicious fried-dough pastry dessert that is dipped into sweet sauces. This worm is between 4 and 10 inches and feeds off molluscs like clams. 9 - Feeling Blue... I would be too if faced with this bright blue tarantula that was discovered in Guyana. It doesn’t even have a name yet, that’s how new it is! It was spotted by Andrew Snyder, who says his flashlight bounced off something very blue, which he thought was just a reflection. When he went closer, he was really surprised to see the bright blue legs of the spider. Firstly, this is the first blue tarantula found in South America, as they’re usually found in Southeast Asia, and secondly, this one was living in a colony, which is very unusual for spiders. 8 - 5 a day… If you’re brave, you can add this bizarre fruit to yours! It’s the obscure relative of the tomato, and it was discovered in Australia. This fruit has been known to botanists for 50 years already, but it was only described officially in 2017. 7th graders helped name this weird fruit the deathly fruit, and when cut open, the flesh of the fruit changes from whitish green to blood red and then matures into a dry, white bony state. The fruit looks very unappetising, and I doubt it’s going to be flying off the shelves anytime soon! 7 - Blooming marvellous… A new species of orchid was found last year, called the devil orchid aka Telipogon diabolicus. This orchid is a fusion of male and female flower parts and as you can see, looks a lot like the head of the devil! This plant is only found in a certain area of Columbia, which is currently threatened by reconstruction. 6 - Now you see me… Now you don’t! You’re aware of how lizards drop their tails in order to escape a predator, but this newly discovered gecko takes things a little further. This creature is covered with overlapping scales, and when it’s in trouble, has the ability to shed those scales and make a quick, naked getaway. Within a few weeks, those scales have grown back and the gecko is ready for action once again. 5 - Down Under… We head down 13,000 feet below the surface of the Pacific Ocean to meet a new species of sponge that was confirmed in 2017. Plenaster craigi have been found in 2013 and 2015, and it was just last year that it was confirmed as an official new species. It was discovered in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone, and live on metal-rich nodules that are common in that area. 4 - Look familiar? Pictured here is the Arcella gandalfi, and if you’ve watched Lord of the Rings, you’ll know why it got that name. These freshwater amoebas were rumoured to exist in Brazil, but they’ve only recently been discovered and confirmed to be real. Considering they’re a single cell organism, these amoeba’s are quite big, measuring 81 micrometers in diameter and 71 micrometers in height. 3 - Pretty in Pink… This is the Pink Floyd pistol shrimp, a new species of snapping shrimp found in the waters off the Pacific coast of Panama. Pink Floyd happened to be one of the favourite bands of the scientists who discovered it. As if the neon pink claw wasn’t strange enough, this crazy shrimp can kill its prey with noise! The snap of that giant claw is loud and powerful that it creates cavitation bubbles, which then burst into the prey, either stunning them or killing them. The sound reaches levels of 210 decibels, which is louder than a gunshot! 2 - No lazing around… An ancient giant sloth fossil was also found in 2017, hidden in an underwater cave in the jungle of the Yucatán in Mexico. This area is not known for many fossil finds, because the humid environment tends to destroy any traces of bones. Vicente Fito went diving in a limestone cave in 2009 where he made this remarkable discovery. He gave the bones to the National Institute of Anthropology and History in Mexico, where they’ve spent all this time piecing everything together. This new species of sloth is thought to weigh around 500-pounds! Apparently the oldest sloth fossil ever found is roughly 9 million years old, and was found in Argentina. 1...
https://wn.com/Amazing_Recently_Discovered_Species
Cabinet approves signing of 15-year contract with International Seabed Authority
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Cabinet approves signing of 15-year contract with International Seabed Authority

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  • Duration: 1:40
  • Updated: 15 Jun 2016
  • views: 555
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Cabinet has approved signing of 15-year contract with International Seabed Authority for undertaking exploration of Polymetallic Sulphides. ‘DD News’ is the News Channel of India's Public Service Broadcaster 'Prasar Bharati'. DD News has been successfully discharging its responsibility to give balanced, fair and accurate news without sensationalizing as well as by carrying different shades of opinion. Follow DD News on Twitter (English): https://twitter.com/ddnewslive Twitter (Hindi):https://twitter.com/DDNewsHindi Face Book: https://www.facebook.com/DDNews Visit DD News Website (English): www.ddinews.gov.in Visit DD News Website (Hindi): http://ddinews.gov.in/Hindi/
https://wn.com/Cabinet_Approves_Signing_Of_15_Year_Contract_With_International_Seabed_Authority
Life at deep sea hydrothermal vents: biodiversity in a new resource frontier
1:03:47

Life at deep sea hydrothermal vents: biodiversity in a new resource frontier

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  • Duration: 1:03:47
  • Updated: 22 Aug 2013
  • views: 5574
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Lecture by Dr Adrian Glover given at the Geological Society on 3 July 2013 as part of the 2013 Shell London Lecture series. It is an oft-told tale that the most famous biological discovery of the late 20th century was made by geologists. In the spring of 1977, a cabal of bearded American oceanographers made the first daring submersible dives to a deep-sea hydrothermal vent in the east Pacific ocean and filmed, photographed and collected the biology that would make them famous. But it was no ignominy for the biology community; uninvited on that first expedition they went on to lead the majority of research at vents over the next three decades. Over 35 years on, it is the geology which may now turn attention back to the deep sea. In 2011 the government of Papua New Guinea granted the world's first deep-sea mining lease to a Canadian corporation to extract copper and gold from a hydrothermal vent field. In March 2013, the UK Prime Minister announced UK government support for the mining of polymetallic nodules in the central Pacific ocean at depths of 4000m. This talk summarises our current understanding of biodiversity at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, and compares it with the soft-sediment, muddy habitats that dominate the rest of the deep seafloor. Dr Adrian discusses the potential impacts of deep-sea mining and the importance of biological data and outlines some of the very newest results from an expedition this year to the Cayman Trough, the worlds deepest hydrothermal vent, that lies in an exclusive economic zone of the United Kingdom.
https://wn.com/Life_At_Deep_Sea_Hydrothermal_Vents_Biodiversity_In_A_New_Resource_Frontier
The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific
7:45

The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

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  • Duration: 7:45
  • Updated: 14 Dec 2016
  • views: 1054
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The ocean has a wealth of resources. From food, to travel, to pharmaceutical needs, and to energy, the ocean has always provided for mankind. And now, mankind is turning to the ocean for minerals and metals needed for the technology we use in our everyday lives. An exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers. Read more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/underwater-mining-pacific-ocean
https://wn.com/The_Next_Frontier_In_Mining_Deep_Sea_Exploitation_In_The_Pacific
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